Our fees are based on the number of activities:
$12 per student – 4 Activities
$14 per student – 5 Activities
$16 per student – 6 Activities
$14 per student – Vacation Day Tours (4 Activities)

Our primary school day tours have been designed as primary school excursions for students from Year 3 – o year 6 with a variety of activities, many relating to the Australian National Curriculum. The students will participate in activities around the Observatory’s grounds and buildings to broaden their knowledge of astronomy and physics while seeing our range of modern and historical telescopes.

Our Out of School Holiday Care tours cater for children from 4 – 11 years old. The children will work in groups of the age ranges 4-6, 7-9, and 10-11 years old with each age group having their own set of four activities. The activities are fun but also educational.

COVID 19 Update

We have made changes to some of our activities to avoid excessive contact with equipment and are setting up extra cleaning and sanitising of surfaces and equipment.

We are asking for your help in making sure that anyone with any possible symptoms does NOT visit the observatory with your school group. All bookings that are confirmed may be affected by any changes in the COVID 19 situation

Maximum Group Size

School Day Tour Size

For school tour visits, the maximum number of students we can cater to is 60 and can only be managed if five or more activities are chosen. The minimum number is 10 except in special circumstances approved by the School Day Tours Subcommittee

Out Of School Holiday Care Tour Size

For Out Of School Holiday Care tour visits, the maximum number of students we can cater to is 40. The minimum number is 10 except in special circumstances approved by the School Day Tours Subcommittee

Please contact us if you are interested in a student tour outside the year levels listed or have more than 60 students (school tours) or 40 students (OSHC tours) so we can discuss ways to accommodate you.

If you have a larger group that you would like to attend and are able to split the attendees into two groups, we are happy to do two tours in one day, one in the morning and one in the afternoon with only three activities per group or run tours over two days.

Max group

Maximum Group Size

School Day Tour Activities

Indicates that a telescope is seen or involved

Year 3/4 Day Tour Activities

M1. Meteorites and the Moon

The students see the (very large) piece of a meteorite in the Observatory Museum, with a discussion covering the history of the meteorite and the most common origins of meteorites. The students then engage in activities demonstrating the moon phases and why we see them.

M2. Our Solar System

Students will look at the order of the planets in the solar system along a scaled route. This will be followed by an extension activity related to the Solar System.

M3. Sun, Earth and Moon

This activity compares the sizes of the sun, earth and moon and then engages the students in role-play to show how the sun, moon and earth interact. An introductory look at the planets is also included with a mnemonic to help remember the order of the planets from the sun

M4. Lowell Telescope 1

This was the main research telescope at the observatory. Students will learn about some aspects of astronomical research and how the telescope works. There will be a discussion about the Mars exploration program and the use of helicopters on Mars, and the student will then make a paper helicopter.

M5. Astrograph 1

By being allowed to move the telescope, students will see how this historical telescope (1896) was still being used in the 1990s for astrophotography. Students are introduced to the long-drawn-out process of taking photographs in the past which is compared to modern photography.

M6. Here comes the Sun

Weather Permitting. students look at shadows and how they change as the Sun appears to move across the sky. They will then move to our Solar viewing dome, where a telescope trained on the Sun transmits mono real-time images via a camera to a computer screen. The students are presented with some limited information about our Sun.

(Do not choose M7 if you select this activity)

M7. Shadows and Sundials
Weather permitting, students look at shadows and how they change as the Sun appears to move across the sky. They examine the observatory sundial and then make a paper sundial of their own which they can use and compare to the time on the Observatory sundial and then take back to school.

(Do not choose M7 if you select this activity)

M8. Sunshine and Rainbows

Students use objects to produce rainbows on a screen. The reason for rainbows is discussed, the use of them and their link to astronomy. The students then have a look at objects through coloured filters to see what happens to the rainbows Note: If you would like the children to use the ‘rainbow glasses’ there will be an extra $1.00 charge per student and the rainbow glasses can be taken home

M10. Telescope Tour

This gives the students an opportunity to look at two or three of the Observatory’s old and more modern telescopes and learn a little bit about their history and what they were used for. This is a useful addition if you would like the students to leave having seen some telescopes but your choices do not include any.

Year 5/6 Day Tour Activities

U1. Spinning Around

The students see the (very large) piece of a meteorite in the Observatory Museum, with
a discussion covering the history of the meteorite and interesting information about them. They then engage in activities that demonstrate moon phases and eclipses.

U2. Solar Walk

This walk demonstrates the distances between the planets using a scale model with facts about the planets presented as they walk. They then try to fit carded information to the right planet discussing specific aspects of some planets.

U3. Solar Rings

The students use teamwork to initially sort the planets into order on our solar rings diagram and then work out which orbital times belong to which planet. Students try to work out how old they would be on some of the planets based on the length of the planets’ orbits and then have an opportunity to see how old they would be on each of the planets. They then engage in an activity that looks at the sizes of the planets and is given a mnemonic to remember the size order.

U4. Lowell Telescope 2

This was the main research telescope at the observatory. Students will learn about some aspects of astronomical research and how the telescope works. The Mars rover and helicopter exploration will be introduced and the student will make a paper helicopter to drop from one of the Lowell platforms.

U5. Astrograph 2

By being allowed to move the telescope, students will see how this historical telescope (1896) was still being used in the 1990s for astrophotography. Students are introduced to the long, drawn-out process of taking photographs in the past which is compared to modern photography.

U6. Seeing the Sun

Weather permitting, students get the opportunity to look at the sun in real-time safely in two different ways. The first is using Sunspotters. The students use these instruments to project an image of the sun indirectly onto a piece of white paper. At no stage does the student look at the sun.

The second is using a dedicated solar telescope with inbuilt solar filters and students look through the telescope at the sun. At all times there is an emphasis on safely looking at the sun and students are instructed to never look at the sun through any other telescope. They then engage in a discussion explaining some of the sun’s activities.

(Do not choose M7 if you select this activity)

U7. Solar Scope

Weather permitting, the students will be able to learn about and read the observatory’s sundial. They will then move to our Solar viewing dome, where a telescope trained on the Sun transmits mono real-time images via a camera to a computer screen. They will be given some information about the Coronado (Solar) Telescope and discuss aspects of and the structure of our Sun.

(Do not choose M7 if you select this activity)

U8. Survival on the Moon

Students learn a bit more about the moon and do a NASA designed activity to see if they and their friends would survive a crash on the moon.

U11. Telescope Tour

This gives the students an opportunity to look at two or three of the Observatory’s old and more modern telescopes and learn a little bit about their history and what they were used for. This is a useful addition if you would like the students to leave having seen some telescopes but your choices do not include any.

Please Note: If the weather does not allow for outside activities, activities presenting similar concepts will take place inside the main building. However, if at all possible, some activities will take place in the domes so that students. can see the telescopes. Perth Observatory reserves the right to change or adjust these activities as necessary.

School tour activities

School Day Tour Activities

Vacation Day Tours Activities

Indicates that a telescope is seen or involved

Day Tour Activities For Kids 4-6 Years Old

JHC1. Mission to Mars

This introduces the children to Mars and its environment using discussion, images, models and an activity making a “Mars surface’. Again, through discussion and images, the way we would reach Mars is discussed with an activity allowing the children to attempt to land a rocket in a circle representing Mars.

JHC2. Our Place in Space

This starts with a Q&A session working out where we live with children using an Earth globe to identify Perth. The discussion then moves to our Sun and talking about sun safety and then the Moon and making craters. If time an activity demonstrating how the Sun, Earth and Moon move around each other may be used.

JHC3. Star Light Star Bright

This activity looks at our Sun and discusses it as a star. It then discusses the shadows that can be made when the Sun is shining and has activities demonstrating some of the ways the colours in sunlight can be shown.

JHC4. Domes and Fairy Doors

The students are given a tour of the Observatory Domes and are encouraged to find the ‘Fairy Doors’ that are on them.

Day Tour Activities For Kids 7-9 Years Old

MHC1. Who are our Neighbours

The children are introduced to the planets of our Solar System They then reinforce

their understanding of the order of the planets by making a planet wheel.

MHC2. Constellation Capers

The children look at constellations either on a poster or on a screen and then make a ‘constellation tube’ showing one of the constellations they have looked at.

MHC3. Sunshine and Rainbows

The children look for visible rainbows and use special lenses to see rainbows everywhere. They have a look at objects through coloured filters to see what happens to the colours and the reason for rainbows is discussed.

MHC4. Deep Impact

The children are engaged in discussing and examining the Observatory meteorite and learning about craters. They watch a demonstration of how craters are made and then enjoy using objects to make craters.

Day Tour Activities For Kids 10-12 Years Old

UHC1. Talking about Telescopes

The children have a tour of some of the observatory telescopes.

UHC2. Sun and Sundials

The children have a look at and discussion about the Observatory sundial and then move inside the University Dome to see images of and learn something about our Sun.

UHC3. Constellation Capers

The children look at constellations either on a poster or on a screen and then make a ‘constellation wheel’ showing some of the constellations they have looked at.

UHC4. Massy Meteorites

This activity is at the Lowell Dome where children investigate whether the mass of an object affects the size of the crater. They will have a brief visit to the Lowell telescope if time allows.

Please Note: If the weather does not allow for outside activities, activities presenting the similar concepts will take place inside the main building. However, if at all possible, some activities will take place in the domes so that students can see the telescopes. Perth Observatory reserves the right to change or adjust these activities as necessary.

Vaction tours activities

Vacation Day Tours Activities

School Products

We have some fantastic products in our Astro Shop to make learning fun and to get your students fascinated with astronomy. Check out our products booklet to see the products we offer and you can order them using the order form.

Products Booklet Order Form

Astroshop sign

Astroshop

School Required Documents

To help you plan and submit the paperwork for your school excursion, we have provided the necessary documents below:

School required doc

School Required Documents

Terms & Conditions CTA

Terms & Conditions

Enquire Today

To allow us to help you plan for your upcoming School Day Tour, please take the time to fill in your details in our booking form below.

Each activity takes 30 minutes, 25 minutes for the activity and a 5 minute changeover time. Please refer to the day tour activity sheets which you can download below and include your choice of activities on the booking sheet. Please allow 10 – 15 minutes at the start of the tour for toilet visits and organisation; 30 minutes for a recess break; and 30 minutes for a lunch break if you are here over lunchtime.

If the activity M8 is chosen and you would like the students to use the Rainbow Glasses, there will be an extra charge of $1.00 per student as the students will take the glasses home. Please add a note to the request form if you would like this

We will contact you shortly after receiving your submission during business hours to assist you.